Showing posts with label NYC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label NYC. Show all posts

Monday, November 9, 2020

The NYC Traveler in NYC: 5 + 5 More Places Locals Visit

 The NYC Traveler in NYC: 

5 More Places NYC Locals Visit (Part 2) 

(and 5 more bonus places)


Since the name of this blog is the NYC Traveler, you may be curious about what the NYC Traveler does when I'm in NYC, my hometown. Below you will find my picks for visiting New York City (and some of the surrounding areas). If you are a NYC metropolitan area resident, you might find some areas to visit for the first time or worth a re-visit. Keep checking!




Other articles: 
5 Places NYC Locals Visit (you may or may not agree!)
Governors Island
Jamaica, Queens
Coney Island

The Series


1. Central Park, above East 79th Street and West 81st Street. Enter at West 86th Street and Central Park West or East 86th Street and Fifth Avenue and enjoy less crowds. Highlights include the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, The Pool, The Loch, The North Meadow, The Ravine, The Woods, Harlem Meer and Great Hill.


Glen Span Arch, near The Pool, enter near West 100th and Central Park West

2. Walk through Harlem, without a tourist guide. An app or a guidebook is just as good and you will develop your sense of adventure. Suggestion: Start at West 125th Street and 7th Avenue (also known as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Blvd and Adam Clayton Powell Jr Blvd), and make your way downtown, ending at Central Park at 110th Street. Don't just stay on one boulevard.

The famous Apollo Theater,
253 West 125th Street,
between Adam Clayton Powell (7th Ave) and Frederick Douglass (8th Ave) Boulevards

3. Go from Queens to Manhattan (or vice versa) via the scenic route, walking or by bicycle. Start at Vernon Avenue and 36th Avenue, in Queens. Explore Roosevelt Island (don't forget Lighthouse Park at the north end). When you're ready, take either the Roosevelt Island Tram or F train to continue your journey into Manhattan. An alternative route is to walk, ride or jog over the Ed Koch (Queensboro/59th Street) Bridge at Queens Plaza and Jackson Avenue. A good way to get a workout. See our other cycling routes.


The Edward I. Koch Bridge, linking Queens and Manhattan

4. Do the same thing with Brooklyn. Walk over the Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan and explore the DUMBO (Down Under Manhattan Bridge Overpass) area, a really cool place to be.

Brooklyn (and the Bridge), as seen from Manhattan


5. Hit up da Bronx: the only NYC Borough on the mainland of the USA, the Bronx is more than the Yankees, the Zoo and the NY Botanical Garden. Van Cortlandt Park and Pelham Bay Park are awesome and will challenge you, whether you are walking or riding a bike. Indeed, many of streets of the Bronx will challenge you with inclines and slopes that will guarantee an appetite. Check out City Island for seafood (and more) or the famous Arthur Avenue (between East 184th and East 188th in the Belmont section). 

Take the bridge from Pelham Bay Park to visit City Island (off I-95)


6. Bryant Park, Manhattan: The square block of East and West 42 Streets between 5th and 6th Avenues. It's a neighborhood park (outdoor film showings); a holiday village Christmastime (complete with tree, vendors and ice skating rink) and a just a great place to take a break on the lawn. Check it out. 



7. The Battery: The Battery is at the very southern tip of Manhattan Island, from State Street and Peter Minuit Plaza (yes, the guy who bought Manhattan from the Native Americans) to Battery Place and Little W Street. State Street becomes Battery Place. In between, enjoy awesome views of Brooklyn, Staten Island, New Jersey and, of course, the Statue of Liberty. Explore Clinton Castle, east from street vendors, ride a carousel or just sit and enjoy the many monuments.


8. Riverside Park: Ride, walk, stroll, jog 4 miles with vast views of the Hudson River and the ever changing New Jersey skyline. Enter or leave between West 72nd Street and West 129 Street. The fun doesn't end at either end of the park, it just changes names: uptown it's Riverbank State Park and downtown it is Hudson River Park before looping around to the Battery.


The Hudson River

9. Along with the Queens Museum, enjoy NYC's Hollywood side at the Museum of the Moving Image or the MOMA's PS 1. When the MOMA was being renovated years ago, they moved part of the collection to an old school building in Queens. It never closed. 


10. Shirley Chisholm State Park, Brooklyn has an interesting history. Created out of a landfill, which had the unfortunate nickname of Mount Garbage, the result is a great park for families. It's small enough to take the kids out with bikes and to hike to the top of the repurposed landfill for a view of the water. 




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 Latest COVID-19 Travel News



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Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links.

Disclaimer: MC Enterprises is not giving exercise nor health advice. Hike Cliff Walk at your own discretion. See a doctor if you are cautious about strenuous exercise. Make sure you know the weather forecast before you head out.

The NYC Traveler in NYC: Part 5, What to do

 The NYC Traveler in NYC:

An Introduction to the City of New York

(practically speaking!)

Part 5: What to Do

Latest COVID-19 Travel News


The Series

Once you get here, what to do? That depends on your interests, your budget and how much time you have.

Typical Tourist Stuff

1. A good place to start is by using a good guide. Online, the official guide is NYC Go. It will have the up-to-date information you will need once you get here, even if you planned your itinerary prior. 

2. When you arrive, look for the Official NYC Guide. It always helps to have a physical guidebook and it is free. If you buy any other guidebook, buy it digitally and download it to your tablet or phone. Honestly, this guide is about all you need for the most popular sites. But, if you want to see off the beaten path stuff, we'll give you that, too.





3. Try to buy all tickets as soon as you can (as of this writing, most locations require a reservation due to health and safety concerns). There are two companies that provide New York City passes that combine several sites in one ticket. Both of them have similar names. City Pass is endorsed by NYC Go. The other company is New York Pass. The company that sells the New York Sightseeing Pass also serves other cities. 

4. Whichever company you use make sure you: a) read everything about payment. Usually there are no refunds. b) have a plan to see everything included in the pass or you won't save much money at all. There are different versions of the passes. c) take a screen shot of everything in case the download or email does not come through. If you can, print out the confirmations before you leave home.


5. If you don't have much time (and you will never be able to fully experience everything, anyway), consider either one of the double decker bus tours or do your own. Figure out what sights to see (tour) and what to experience (go in). You can honestly say you saw the Empire State Building without going to the top. Ditto for the Top of the Rock in Rockefeller Center. Save those for the next trip.

Here are my top picks for a first timer:

Manhattan

1. Tour the Battery and Lower Manhattan. Try to tour the Statue of Liberty, (more Statue of Liberty info); Federal Hall and the 911 Memorial. Know that only Statue Cruises is authorized can sell you tickets to the ferry for the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. We strongly advise you to purchase directly from them. If you have a tour guide, make sure you can verify they are purchasing from them as well. 

2.  Midtown: See Times Square but then head over to the area between East and West 42- 50th Streets between 5th and 6th Avenues. You'll see Bryant Park (5th and 6th Aves, 42nd Street) and Rockefeller Center 5th and 6th Aves, 47-50 Streets). Tip: The East Side ends at 5th Avenue. Bryant Park and Rockefeller Center area straddle 5th and 6th Avenues, so they are located on the East and West Sides.


Bryant Park



3. Take a trip uptown to Harlem and/or Washington Heights. A NYC well-known "secret": the so-called Southern classic chicken and waffles actually originated in NYC! There are tours for Harlem as well as classic church visits.

4. Want to do something for free and see more than one borough? Walk across the Brooklyn or Williamsburg Bridges to Brooklyn or the Ed Koch (59th Street) Bridge to Queens. Even more adventurous? Ride a bicycle instead and see even more of the other boroughs.

5. If you can only do one museums, try the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It has modern art and some nature also, a combo of the other more specialized museums. Every museum is worthy of a visit, though. 

Staten Island

1. The ferry is fun to take (and currently, free) but unless you have firm plans to see something there, you'll be just taking a round trip across the Upper Bay. But, to the right as you exit, there is the Staten Island September 11 Memorial waterfront park. Brooklyn and Queens residents were able to witness the tragedy also, but Staten Island seemed closer with a front row seat. All three boroughs felt helplessness as they watched the towers fall and the area be destroyed. (There are other memorial parks throughout the city).



2. Having said that, Historic Richmond Town, though small, is a charming and quaint area of 17th century houses and buildings. You do expect the founding fathers to walk down the street. Check the website to see if the buildings are open. Some activities may be happening outside of the buildings. 

3. The Staten Island Zoo has indoor and outdoor exhibits.

Bronx

1. If it is your first time, then the Bronx Zoo, of course and the New York Botanical Garden. Both attractions should be done separately, since they can take a day each, but since they are located near each other, many people try to visit them on the same outing.

2. If you like to hang with the locals, hit up City Island, a nautical eating experience for all things seafood. For an even more local experience, try Orchard beach.

3. If available, a visit to the New York Yankees is always a great outing. Even those not interested in baseball will appreciate Monument Park and the museum.

4. Many people don't realize that the Bronx is actually on the mainland USA, rather than on a island like the other 4 boroughs. It starts to resemble upstate NY with the hills and slopes. Van Cortlandt Park and Pelham Bay Park will give you a good workout.

Arthur Ave, the Bronx, set up for outdoor dining


5. Eat yourself silly on Arthur Avenue, a block or two of the finest mostly Italian eating in the city (with all due respect to Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn).

Brooklyn
At one time, it was said that one in four Americans could trace a family member to Brooklyn. It was also literally the 4th largest city in the USA. It was a city when it was incorporated into NYC.

1. Want to hang with the locals? Go to Coney Island. Even in the winter time, the original Nathan's is worth the trip (featuring hot dogs, seafood, fries and more). A throwback to the old amusement park, with a modern twist, a day can include the New York Aquarium and the minor league team the Brooklyn Cyclones, all within walking distance of each other.

Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn: walking distance to the 
Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Prospect Park


2. Downtown Brooklyn has become the new millennial spot. Normally, you have your choice of performing arts at BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music), sports and other events at the Barclays Center, nature walks in Prospect Park (which has a zoo and waterfall!) and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and the art of the Brooklyn Museum. It's hard to do it all in one day, but some people try.

3. Make your way over to DUMBO (Down Under Manhattan Bridge Overpass). Despite its name, it's easier to walk over the Brooklyn Bridge and then head to the left. Filled with shopping, galleries and eating, instead of taking the train back to Manhattan, you might have to walk off the calories going back over the bridge.

4. The Brooklyn Promenade (less than a mile walk along the East River between the Brooklyn Bridge towards Atlantic Avenue) has great views of Manhattan, snack trucks and a restaurant and gourmet ice cream near the bridge.

5. The new kid on the block is Domino Park, in Williamsburg. On the site of the old Domino Sugar factory, you explore 5 small acres that packs in a lot, including views of Manhattan's skyline. Be there at sunset.

Queens

1. Although we don't recommend renting a car when you visit NYC, exploring Queens is a good reason to rent one for the day. A trip to the Queens County Farm Museum, a working farm, will help you to understand how Queens was farm land way back in the day.

2. Another great place to see the sunset over Manhattan's skyline is Gantry Plaza State Park, 4-09 47th Rd. Food trucks are lined up to help you stay nourished as you get a place among tourists and locals alike. 

3. The heart of Queens' tourism lies in or near the Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Check out our blog here. A full day or more, you have your choice of the Queens Zoo, the Hall of Science, CitiField, USTA tennis, the Queens Museum, or just the park itself. You won't know what to do first.

Flushing Meadows Corona Park


4. Queens is considered one of the most diverse ethnic areas in the world. And the food is here also. A walk down any major street will give you more choices that you have room for. Get a local perspective: Broadway between 21st and 41st Streets (with the Museum of the Moving Image in the area); Vernon Boulevard between 46th and 51st Avenues in Long Island City (and the MOMA at PS 1 art musuem); and in Jackson Heights near Roosevelt Avenue and 74th Street.

5. It took years, but finally the beaches of Queens are restored enough to reopen. There is still work going on, but head out to Jacob Riis Park. There is a family area as well as sections for those more daring. It's a great alternative to Coney Island and Rockaway Beach, which can be more crowded.



Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links.

Thursday, October 29, 2020

The NYC Traveler: Getting Around, Part 4

 The NYC Traveler in NYC:

An Introduction to the City of New York

(practically speaking!)


The Series

Part 4: Getting Around

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Arriving to NYC and getting to your lodging is one thing. Getting around to see the sights is another. As you will read in many, many guides, the best way to see the sights is to use mass (public) transportation and then, once you reach your destination, walk. 

BONUS Tip #1: Read the NYC Official Guide and the MTA website for safety tips. 

BONUS Tip #2: Be aware of your surroundings, do not take your valuables out in crowded locations. Take your carfare or ticket out in a secure location and keep it in a front pocket to use when you get close to your destination.

BONUS Tip #3: Put a strap on your camera. Get a phone case that accommodates a strap. Make sure it is secure and stay alert.

BONUS Tip #4: Carry bags that can close up completely, can be put close you, like a crossbody or waist pack and are RIFD secure. Try to carry credit/debit cards rather than cash. Even better, make sure your electronic version is set up in your phone. Carry copies of your passport and keep the original in the safe in your lodging. You will need to carry one real piece of ID.

Here are your options.




1. Car: as we mentioned in Part 3, Arrival to NYC, driving in many parts of the City of New York is only for the most experienced and bravest of drivers (and this goes for all 5 boroughs). And it may not be because of navigation, but because of traffic and parking. Manhattan Island is only 22 miles in length and it can take you more than an hour to get from the Battery to the end at Broadway and West 220 Street, probably two. If you drive to NYC, invest in parking the car for your stay. If you drive a rental to NYC from another state, return it to the airport and then rent it again to return home. 


2. Subway: subways run in and to and from all five boroughs. Staten Island has a subway line that runs on the island only. To get to another borough, you must take a bus or ferry. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), has a website and an app, which has been upgraded. You can enter your starting point and destination and it will tell you how to get there (and how long it may take). You will need a metro card (still available as of late 2020) or you can use the new OMNY system, which links to your credit card or digital wallet. This would be if you are staying in the city for a long time. Not all scanners are in all stations, so it is best to get a metro card (See picture in 3). You put a certain amount on the card and swipe at the train station or to get on the bus. Metro cards cost $1 in addition to the fare. You can refill it at metro card machines. 


3. Subway lines are color coded and use numbers (1-7) and letters (A-G, J, L-N, Q, W, Z). The letter S trains are shuttles and there are 3. Visitors most likely will use the 42nd street shuttle to go from Port Authority to Grand Central. 

4. Bus: The buses are great for shorter trips. There are now bus only lanes in Manhattan and in some of the outer boroughs. The nice part about a bus in any city is that you can see the city. Use the MTA website and app to plan your trip. Beware of express buses. You must purchase the ticket at the machine at the bus stop before you board. Express buses are best for going from one borough to another or to LaGuardia Airport.



5. Cabs and car services: cabs can be hailed (waved down in the street) in Manhattan, called by phone in the outer boroughs and can be caught by standing on line at the can stand at the airports. Car services such as Uber and Lyft work the same way as any other place. Local cars, such as the "dollar vans" should only be used by locals (if you happen to be traveling with one). 

6. Walking: For all the glamour that is in NYC, everyone walks, even rich folk. Try getting off the bus or subway a couple of stops from your destination and walk the rest of the way. If you're stuck in traffic, it might be best anyway. Have a good map app on your phone. We use Google Maps.


7. Cycling: Bicycling around town increased tremendously in NYC during the pandemic. It can be a great way to see the city. However, if you are using it as a method of transportation, there are a few guidelines: you must go with the traffic, have a bell, have lights for dusk and night. Children under 16 must have a helmet and adults are strongly urged to wear one also. You should have 3 locks: one for the frame to the parking place (trees, poles and street lamps are illegal); and one each to lock each tire to the frame. Bike maps are free in bike shops. You can rent one from a bike shop or use Citi Bike and return it to a kiosk when you reach your location. By using Citi Bike, you don't have to worry about locking it up.

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8. Tour buses: you will see people in red jackets selling you tour rides in sightseeing buses. Hop on, hop off buses are great ways to see the sights and they plan the route for you. Some tickets include a location, like the Empire State Building. Since it is difficult to determine who is legitimate or not on the streets, it is best to buy your ticket online or through your travel consultant.  Big Bus Tours is the most popular.

9. Private tours are also available. Make sure you research very carefully; consult your travel consultant or hotel concierge. 

10. Local friends and family: asking a friend about getting around NYC can be valuable and you may end up with a tour guide. Many times, locals have not been to all of the sightseeing places and it could be fun for both of you.

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Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links.

The NYC Traveler in NYC: Part 2, Staying in NYC

The NYC Traveler in NYC:

An Introduction to the City of New York

(practically speaking!)

Staying in NYC: 

The Series

How to Pick a Hotel

If you are traveling to New York City from outside of the United States, please check the US Department of State and the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) website for the latest information.


BOOK YOUR TRIP TO NYC

BONUS Tip #1: Manhattan addresses will be New York, New York. Brooklyn, Bronx and Staten Island addresses are the same as their borough name. But Queens addresses run by their neighborhood: Long Island City, Jamaica, Flushing, Astoria, Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, etc (there are many more). See Bonus Tip #4.

BONUS Tip #2: Midtown Manhattan is traditionally considered from 59th Street to 23rd Street from river to river. This is a loose definition, as some neighborhoods either want to or don't want to be considered midtown, depending on which local you talk to. Uptown is anything above 96th street on both the East Side and West Side. Central Park is the dividing line (even where it's not): The East Side is streets from 5th Avenue to the East River; the West Side is from 6th Avenue to the Hudson River. Below 14 Street (Union Square), it becomes a little less clear.

BONUS Tip #3: Beware of Broadway. Clearly the longest street in Manhattan, it really goes from The Battery all the way to West 220 Street, winding through, never in a straight line. When you think you are still walking on it, you are on another avenue. If you could drive it without traffic, it would be quite a tour. You would hit everything that Manhattan had to offer.

BONUS Tip #4: Learn how to use a map app. Other tourism apps are helpful, but nothing beats an app that is connected to GPS. My top pick is Google Maps.

 Latest COVID-19 Travel News




What to do in NYC? The possibilities are endless. You could live here for a lifetime and never explore what each borough has to offer. To make sure you are where you want to be, use a good map, either on paper, online or digital. With that said, here are our top 10 tips for booking lodging in NYC:

1. Don't be afraid of public transportation. You can use cabs, limo services and car services to get around but they will be in the same traffic that a rental car would be in. The subway usually moves the fastest. And, there are more bus lanes so that surface transit gets through road traffic faster than cars. Cabs and car services do not have access to bus lanes.




2. Many people stay in Manhattan for many reasons, mainly because it's the borough people think of most when they they of New York City,: more attractions, more options of public transportation (almost all of the subway lines run through Manhattan), restaurants that have long hours. If you stay in midtown, consider hotels on side streets, rather than just on the major avenues. 

3. Don't be fooled by "minutes to midtown Manhattan" promises when booking lodging, especially if you stay in Brooklyn or Queens. It's best to stay in these boroughs if you plan to tour only these areas. For example, if you to see mostly the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Prospect Park and downtown Brooklyn and only make one trip to Manhattan, then stay in downtown Brooklyn. But if these sites will be combined in one day trip and you are seeing most of your sites in Manhattan, it's best to stay in Manhattan and take the train to Brooklyn.

Brooklyn's Atlantic Terminal train station


4. Like any other city, using alternatives to traditional hotels takes savvy. For example, most motels are independently owned franchises. They may have certain rooms set aside for long term residents such as those placed by the city. Sometimes, this experience is not always positive. Stick with the major brands.



5. Hotels close to the airport make it easier to catch a flight but are not necessarily easy for sightseeing and getting around (see our article about arriving to NYC). However, there are more hotels being built near Jamaica station that are convenient to JFK Airport and Manhattan. You can be at Penn Station within a half hour using the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). The neighborhood is very residential but is being developed for tourism. Also, there are fewer restaurants and much less night life. Just be aware of Tip #4. 

Jamaica Station, Queens


6. Using a travel consultant can get you information on Manhattan hotels that you may not see on booking sites, particularly if the agent is either based in NYC or very familiar with the city.

7. There is other lodging in New York City through sites such as VRBO (incorporating Homeaway) and AirBnB. Once again, consult with a travel consultant, read the reviews carefully.



8. Once you begin to come to NYC a little more, you will get to know the neighborhoods better and you can make an informed decision regarding vacation rental locations. Make a note of amenities such as distance from transit, food stores and restaurants and even a laundry place in case the apartment does not have appliances.

9. Make a broad itinerary so that you can get an idea of which area you should stay. Midtown Manhattan works well if you are planning to go uptown (Harlem, Washington Heights) and downtown (The Battery, South Street Seaport). Most of the subways to the outer boroughs run through midtown. If you want to see many museums, consider the East Side. 

10. Finally, look at other sources such as this blog, social media groups and travel guides. You may see information in common that will help you to make the best decision for you.






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Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.


Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links. I am an Amazon Associate.


The NYC Traveler: Part 3, Arrival to NYC

The NYC Traveler in NYC:

An Introduction to the City of New York

(practically speaking!)

Part 3: Arrival to NYC

Remember: The City of New York consists of 5 boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island. Public transportation, also called mass transit, are our subways (known as the metro in other countries, the train), buses and ferries.



Latest COVID-19 Travel News




1. If you arrive in NYC by your own vehicle, it is best to try to park it for the time you're here unless you take day trips. If you stay in Manhattan and go to the outer boroughs, you can drive but once you get to your destination, for the most part, it will be difficult to park at the most popular sites. However, although it may cost money to park in a garage, you will save time, gas and aggravation trying to park on the street, which is almost impossible in midtown Manhattan, downtown Brooklyn, many parts of Queens (despite its reputation of it possibly being the most suburban borough), the Bronx and Staten Island.


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2. If you arrive to NYC in a rental, return it as soon as you drop off your bags at your lodging and see below how to get back if you drop it at an airport.

3. A few exceptions that you can drive to would be Queens Flushing-Meadows Corona Park complex (with the USTA Tennis Center, Hall of Science, Queens Museum, and the Queens Zoo); the New York Botanical Garden and the Bronx Zoo; and Old Richmond Town in Staten Island. However, with the exception of the Bronx, going to the outer boroughs can cost you money in tolls, gas and more importantly, time.




4. If you arrive by airplane at JFK or LGA, you have several options: take pre-arranged transportation (most expensive but private); cab (second most expensive but also private); car service such as Uber or Lyft; get a lift (yes, pun intended), but make sure you stay in constant touch because your friend cannot stay there more than 2 minutes if you are not out yet. Other options involve public transportation.

5. From JFK: take a local bus if you're staying in Jamaica, Queens. Several buses run in, through and out of JFK (remember, locals work there and need to get to work). To get to the other boroughs, take the air train, which requires a fare to get to Jamaica's train station at Sutphin Boulevard. From there, you will see clear info about your choices: the regional train Long Island Railroad (LIRR) to Penn Station in Manhattan or Atlantic Avenue Terminal in Brooklyn. Or, you can take the subway, bus (a long ride to Manhattan, not advised), cab or car service or to your destination.




6. From LGA (LaGuardia Airport), you can also take public transportation. There is a select bus, the LaGuardia Link. You must purchase the fare at a curbside machine, not pay onboard. The receipt will be your ticket to board. Regular buses will get you from LGA, also: the M60 takes you to upper Manhattan and the Q70 will take you to the subway. From there, you can take the subway, bus, cab or car service or to your destination.

7. From EWR (Newark): the air train will get you to Penn Station via Amtrak or NJ Transit. From there, you can take the subway, bus, cab or car service or to your destination.




8. If you arrive by train, meaning Amtrak, you will arrive at Penn Station, West 32 Street-West 34th Streets between 7th and 8th Avenues, Manhattan. From there, you can take the subway, bus, cab or car service or to your destination.





9. If you arrive by a major bus carrier, you will arrive at Port Authority Bus Terminal, West 40-West 42 Streets and 8th Avenue. From there, you can take the subway, bus, cab or car service or to your destination.

10. If you are going to Staten Island: the ferry leaves from lower Manhattan, near The Battery. The select bus goes through Brooklyn. Once on the island, there is train and bus service. If you are coming in to the city and you are headed to Staten Island, it's best to take a cab or car service or at least take it to lower Manhattan and to take the ferry



BONUS TIP: You just might arrive by cruise ship if it sails from one location and docks here. You will arrive at one of three area ports: Manhattan Cruise Terminal, 12th Avenue near West 54 Street; Cape Liberty, which is technically Bayonne, New Jersey but so close to Staten Island you could walk there; Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, Red Hook, Brooklyn. All of them are extremely inconvenient to travel from with luggage using public transportation directly. The best route is to use either the cruise line sponsored transport service or take a cab to the public transportation and go from there.


Amtrak (mobile app available)
John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK, mobile app available)
LaGuardia Airport (LGA, mobile app available)
Newark Liberty Airport (EWR, mobile app available)


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Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links.