Showing posts with label children. Show all posts
Showing posts with label children. Show all posts

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Intro to...Assateague Park and Ocean City, MD

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 This review is my personal opinion. I am not paid by anyone. I do not receive any amenities (free or discounted). I am an Amazon Associate.

Assateague Park and Ocean City, Maryland 



1. Although this is a national seashore, there is a fee to enter per vehicle but you can purchase an annual pass.

2. If you're biking, beware of horses, deer and other animals and the droppings they leave behind. It can be an obstacle course. Be careful about the beach. The horses were in the parking lot and near the concession stand. If you want to sit on the beach, the animals have free reign (including leaving their droppings).


The wild horses are just that.

3. There are warnings every where about approaching the animals and feeding them. They are wild, descendants of domesticated horses probably from the 1700's. Take the warnings seriously. In addition to your medical bill, you'll also get fined! 

A shy resident deer in Assateague Park

4. Horses can been seen by entering from either Maryland or Virginia (Chincoteague, a privately owned fenced in area). Assateague in Maryland fills up quickly during summer weekends. 


Despite the crowds, you can find an isolated spot in the area

Ocean City...

is a colorful, noisy and crowded conglomeration of food one should never have regularly (but can't be resisted) and amusements from a bygone era. 




1. There are amusement park rides that only exist now in state fairs rather than theme parks and old-school game rooms (play lands). This is a boardwalk on steroids. It's a step back in time and if you haven't been for a while, you'll feel immediately transported to a bygone era. 




2. The amusement park areas are not all owned by the same people, so tickets are not transferable. You'll have to pay to park your car if you are not staying on the boardwalk. Make sure you have some money (some businesses are cash only), get an ice cream cone and stroll along the boardwalk. Enjoy!

3. Stop by the Bayside Skillet on the way out.


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Thursday, May 1, 2014

Kids, Travel and You: Part 2: Ages 18-21

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Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I am not paid by anyone. I do not receive any amenities (free or discounted).  I am an Amazon Associate.

KIDS, TRAVEL AND YOU: PART 2 - Ages 18-21


Our last entry touched upon prepping for a trip with children. In this case, children can refer to anyone ages 0-21. This entry is about traveling with 18-21 year olds.




1. Who Pays? Traveling with the 18-21 year old group is tricky. Parents may be reluctant to leave them at home. Kids may not want to go...or, since you're paying, they might.  If a child is working, it should be clear who is paying for what. If the parents invited the child, then it is probably expected they will pay for transportation, lodging, food and entry fees. Kids should kick in for their clothes, souvenirs and snacks. If a child is not working and the parent invited the child, then the parent pays for it all.





2. Ground Rules.  Before the car rolls away from the house on the way to the airport or the turnpike, get the ground rules down: there have to be curfews at resorts or hotels; your child should not drive rental cars, period; kids have to respect the rules of the cruise ship night clubs (some are for 18 and over and some are for 21 and over); drinking is prohibited on cruises for those 20 and younger; in other countries, if it's legal, you should decide if your child will drink. Also, establish if the older sibling may have to watch over younger ones at least one night so that mom and dad can go out.


3. What to do?: the destination. Since traveling with children is usually a family vacation, this goes back to what I mentioned in Part 1 of this series. It is tricky, but a family vacation should incorporate something that all will enjoy at some point. 

4. Bonding. traveling with the 18-21 age group can be rewarding if you respect them for the young adults they are. This is a fragile time in your family as you set the stage for the adult relationship you will have as you both grow older. Who knows? This may be the beginning of a beautiful adult traveling friendship with none other than your own kids!

Part 3 of this series: Travel to Europe with Kids. Read Part 1, the intro

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Thursday, April 24, 2014

Kids, Travel and You - Part 1: Planning

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Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.


Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I am not paid by anyone. I do not receive any amenities (free or discounted). I am an Amazon Associate.



KIDS, TRAVEL AND YOU - PART 1: PLANNING


Central Park Break Dancers (Editorial Use)
5 THINGS TO REMEMBER



Fair in Central Park, NYC (Editorial Use)
1. Be the adults

When you plan a family trip, take charge as the adults. A family vote is nice, but too much leeway towards the kids can lead to issues when they become teens. 

Although each activity optimistically should appeal to everyone, realistically, that may not be possible. Remind kids, "We did something you liked last night, tonight is your brother's choice and we will all be fair and participate." If this is standard procedure in your family lifestyle, this should not be a problem. But if this is something new, then you have to start this policy months before the actual trip. Establish your standards, rules, guidelines and boundaries long before you are on the road.


Bicycling in Cape Cod (Editorial Use)


2. Prep and Plan with the Kids

Prepare your children about the destination. Prep them by eating at a restaurant locally that serves the food you will find; visit a museum exhibit, watch travel shows on TV, cable or the internet; watch a popular movie that has the locations you are going to see. 

Emphasize the financial part of planning a trip. For the big dream trips, remind them that a few sacrifices have to be made. Let them start their own fund. Then they can manage their own spending money on the trip. Set boundaries before they get there: "everyone will get one souvenir in this price range and one treat."
Busch Gardens in Williamsburg, VA, near Colonial Williamsburg, a good family trip (Editorial Use)

3. Plan with the Kids in Mind...

I have found out that kids will embrace new experiences if you are excited about them. But also, I will plan activities with a kid slant. This calls for doing a little homework and research in advance.

4. ...Plan for some Grown-Up Time

Kids should also know that at some point there will be grown-up time. Resorts will arrange for a child sitter. Plan your fun around the kids activities on cruises or at resorts. If you are traveling with more than one family, take turns watching the kids.


Night time in Ogunquit, Maine, complete with trolley (Editorial Use)

5. Pay attention to the lodging

In the USA, it seems as if the entire vacation industry understands you may have children with you. Resorts and hotels have pools, water slides, miniature golf, video games and references for child sitters. Cruise ships have kids clubs and adult only areas. 

Other countries are a different story. For one thing, some European hotels call a child someone under 10. You may have to pay for more than one room. A great option is to rent an apartment while in Europe. Trip Advisor, HomeAway, Condo Direct and AirBnB are good sources. You will have the space at a decent price and the option to prepare meals. However, daily maid service is not an option (sorry!).


Covered Bridge in New England (Editorial Use)

Coming up: Part 2, traveling with 18-21 year olds.

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