Showing posts with label staycation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label staycation. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

NYC Traveler in NYC: Wave Hill, Bronx

 The NYC Traveler in NYC: 

Wave Hill, the Bronx

This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links. 

Become Inspired by the Gardens:

Grow Your Own Indoors


Wave Hill, in the Bronx
Your own private retreat

Hudson River view

1. Located in the Hudson Hill section in Riverdale, in the Bronx, you will soon realize why that section is called Hudson Hill. Beautiful views of the Hudson River await you.

Wave Hill House

2. The mansion, Wave Hill House, was built in 1843, with a series of owners and occupants, including Mark Twain, who leased it in 1901. The house burned down and was rebuilt in 1927. The 1960's owners deeded it to NYC and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Glyndor Gallery

3. In addition to the mansion, there is Glyndor Gallery, another house on the property that normally holds exhibits and other events.


4. The focus is the gardens: outdoor settings, greenhouses and the grounds themselves, where you are free to sit, read, stroll and use it as your private retreat.


5. You can also take a couple of short hikes on the trails that circle the property: identify trees, do some bird watching and get a little exercise.




Related Articles and Videos:

Marginal Way virtual stroll, view our You Tube Video




Latest COVID-19 Travel News


Scroll to the very bottom and click the social media icons to share this article. Happy Travels!

Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.


Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

This review is my personal opinion. I have Booking links. I am an Amazon Associate.


All text and photos copyright Marcia Crayton All Rights Reserved 2020

Monday, August 24, 2020

Post-COVID-19 Travel: The New Normal Must Haves

Post-COVID-19 Travel:

The New Normal

TRAVEL MUST HAVES


This article is my personal opinion based on my personal travel. I currently do not receive any compensation from the travel industry. However, I am an Amazon Associate.

I am an Amazon Associate and purchasing from these links will help to support this blog.

As regions around the world alternately quarantine and reopen, travelers are cautiously exploring their regions, in staycations and/or road trips. Safety is still important, so stock up on these must haves:


1. Keep a head start on your health with your own no-touch thermometer.
                   

2. Avoid touching public surfaces such as doors, keypads and screens with a no-touch tool.                      


3. Slip these convenient size hand sanitizers right into your pocket.

                           

4. Face masks have become mandatory in many US states and public places. Be healthy and fashionable. Try these, with replaceable filters.

                                

5. Throw a pack of hand sanitizer wipes in the bag to freshen up.

                          

6. Feel a little safer with little ones on the potty with these extra large toilet seat covers.

                            

7. Stay hydrated with a metal water bottle that stays cold all day.


8. Get a metal drinking straw for the each member of the family.

9. Carry your own shopping bags that can double as packing bags.           

10. Always travel with a small first aid kit, even when there isn't a pandemic.


Follow our other blog: The NYC Dis Traveler for your theme park updates

Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.


                      

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

The NYC Traveler: Staycation Projects

 Staycation Projects 




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Happy Travels!

For the latest updates for all travel click these links:

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

This article is my personal opinion based on my personal travel. I currently do not receive any compensation from the travel industry. However, I am an Amazon Associate. At no cost to you, I will earn commission if you shop through our links.


The COVID-19 2019-2020 pandemic crisis required folks worldwide to quarantine at home for weeks, sometimes months. All of a sudden, despite businesses and academic institutions requiring us to work from home, we actually had some time on our hands. We can now do all of those projects "we always wanted to do, if we had the time."


1. Learn a new language. Whether travel resumes full time in the near future or just for personal achievement, it's always cool to be able to say a few words in another tongue. Our personal favorite is Pimsleur. Although they now offer subscriptions like other companies, such as Babbel and Rosetta Stone, they still offer MP3 downloads so that you can own the course permanently.

Indira Ghandi Airport, India


2. Get in shape. While we were reacquainting ourselves with our kitchens and gyms were closed, we realized that we had to figure out exercising on our own. You'll want to look good when you get back to the beach. Apps such as Nike, Adidas, Strava, My Fitness Pal and about a thousand others have lessons, coaches and even virtual competitions. Lace up and go.


Jamaica, West Indies


3. Become a gourmet. Look like an expert when you resume fine dining. Practice at home. Cooking shows abound but you can start with the Cooking Channel or the Food Network. Of course, there are many apps, check out with Yum,  Epicurious and Allrecipes. You might need some equipment. Shop our favorites here.


Creme Brulee in Paris, France


4. Become an artist. Travel art is more than sunset photos. Post and/or sell your artwork on Shutterstock (photography), Soundcloud (music), Etsy (artistic creations), Wattpad (writing),  Instagram, Pinterest and YouTube. Want to learn something? Try TakeLessons. For kids, try DIY.org

Greece


5. Discover your home again. If you really miss traveling and staying at resorts and hotels, bring a little bit of it home with you. When hotels upgrade, they sell their stuff to liquidators: Hotel Liquidators and Resort Furniture Liquidators are just two.


Grace Bay Resort, Turks and Caicos


Photos and text copyright by Marcia Crayton, 2020, All Rights Reserved


Friday, October 12, 2018

The NYC Traveler: A Big Apple Summer

A BIG APPLE SUMMER:
WHAT TO DO IN NEW YORK CITY



Summertime in the Big Apple

New Yorkers tend to be divided into two camps for touring their hometown: those who do and those who don't (and may not know how). If you find that you have to spend part or all of the summer in the Big Apple, check out these tips:

1. NYC Residents: Get NYC identification. There are many benefits, such as discounted annual museum memberships, entertainment tickets and park department membership discounts. There are also several companies that sell combo passes for multiple attractions. Click here for a list.




2. Get around town with public transportation. There are car services, but the best deal in town is still the MTA. Most residents already have the current way to pay, a MetroCard. There is a new system coming, OMNY. Check out the website to make sure that you have the one that suits your needs. Street Smart: Only buy a metro card from an official machine or at a ticket booth. Do not buy from anyone who approaches you at a station or on the street.




3. Ask a New Yorker if they have been to the Statue of Liberty or the Empire State Building and it is a good bet they may say no. So, New Yorkers, act like a tourist and take a look at the Official Guide to New York. You can pick up the print version in Grand Central or Penn Station or in the Times Square Information center



4. All of the NYC parks have summer activities. As per current COVID-19 restrictions, some annual events are not occurring but the parks are open. Grab a bicycle, and choose a borough (or two) to explore. Get the app or check out the calendar.



5. Explore memberships at the museums, gardens and zoos. Along with admission, you get discounts on dining, shopping and first peeks at new events and exhibits. Museums have too many works to display, so exhibits are changing constantly. Plus, they sponsor great events such as concerts, lectures Here are some of the more popular museums:





All photos and text copyright Marcia Crayton, All Rights Reserved, 2020

Follow our other blog: The NYC Dis Traveler for your theme park updates

Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.

Scroll down to the very bottom and click the social media icons to share this article. Happy Travels!

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

This article is my personal opinion based on my personal travel. I currently do not receive any compensation from the travel industry. However, I am an Amazon Associate.


Sunday, March 25, 2018

The NYC Traveler in NYC: 5 Places NYC Locals Visit, Part 1

The NYC Traveler in NYC:

Hang Out in NYC Like a Local 
(Tourist spots we visit but we don't want to admit)

Latest COVID-19 Travel News


Scroll to the very bottom and click the social media icons to share this article. Happy Travels!



The Unisphere in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens



1. The Museums: New Yorkers might belong to museums as members or have free or discounted access with a NYC ID. Having a membership allows great flexibility, you don't have to feel rushed to see everything in one visit and you can attend special members only events. Take advantage of musical events, workshops, lectures and other events. It's like having a community center.


The MoMA: Museum of Modern Art

2. The Highline: take an old elevated train track, make use of the spaces underneath with great restaurants, add the Whitney Museum at one end and the number 7 train hub at the other, mix well and you have a nice way to spend an afternoon in most weather. Currently, you must reserve a timed entry to enjoy the park.


The elevated High Line, viewed from the street

3. The Parks: Tourists head to Central Park but locals hang out in their neighborhood parks which range from a one block square or triangle to acres and acres. Journey to Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx; Cunningham Park, Alley Pond Park, Kissena Park or Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens; Prospect Park or Carnarsie Pier in Brooklyn (along with the entire Coney Island area) and Latourette Park in Staten Island. Golf, swim, bicycle or just sit out under a tree. 


NYC Parks: Places to Go


Check the websites for festivals in NYC Parks

4. Greenwich Village: Below 14th (East and West), Manhattan does not have the square grid design of streets and avenues. Resembling our European city cousins, streets angle in and out, seemingly follow no set pattern and reveal delightful little nooks and crannies such as church gardens, boutiques, small theaters and sidewalk cafes. 



Father Demo Square, Bleecker Street and 6th Avenue

5. Our Street Fairs: Although the most neutral source of information should be the nyc.org website, on its Citywide Events page, it may not always be up-to-date. Searching NYC street fairs on the internet will yield the websites for the companies that seem to sponsor the generic fairs. But, when the real festivals occur, they draw the locals. Check for the latest information about NYC Events.



Happy Travels.

Follow our other blog: The NYC Dis Traveler for your theme park updates

Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.


Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I am not paid by anyone. I do not receive any amenities (free or discounted). However, I am an Amazon Associate.


Monday, October 13, 2014

The NYC Traveler: Leaves, Apples and Wine, Oh My!

Latest COVID-19 Travel News




Scroll to the very bottom and click the social media icons to share this article. Happy Travels!

Purchase our fine art, decor or stock photos on ShutterstockImageKind, mcraytonphoto.comiStock by Getty Images, Etsy, Zenfolio and Dreamstime.


Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 if the copyright act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 This review is my personal opinion. I am not paid by anyone. I do not receive any amenities (free or discounted). However, I am an Amazon Associate.

LEAVES, APPLES AND WINE, OH MY!
A GUIDE TO PLANNING YOUR 
AUTUMN LEAF-PEEPING TRIP

In Northern USA, autumn is a time for some Northerners to close their summer residences to snowbird in warmer climates. As they're leaving town, they pass by others who are headed north to enjoy the magnificent visual feast the leaves offer. Read on to know what to know before you go (and plan).





1. Where to go:  the public and national parks. Out West, Northern California, Washington State, Upper Idaho, Montana and Oregon have the landscapes photographers deam about. Mountainous areas such as Tennessee, Colorado, Pennsylvania and Western North Carolina are all beautiful. In the Northeast, check out New England (Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut), upstate New York, the Poconos of Pennsylvania and upper New Jersey. These areas are great for mountains, lakes, waterfalls and small picturesque towns.



2. When to go: Brilliant fall colors are dependent on various climate factors during the summer. Late August and early September give good indicators when foliage will reach peak colors and how vibrant the leaves will be. Cool summer weather might lead to less than fantastic colors. Hot wet summers, a gradual cooling September and later frosts might yield great color. A rainy windy and cold September might knock the leaves off sooner without them giving their full potential of color. Use a weather website and fall foliage maps to help you plan. Leaves change color and reach peak anytime from mid-September to late October.



3. What else to do: After sightseeing, enjoy the areas where the leaves are: farms, orchards, wineries, antique shops. Activities at local farms include u-pick-ur own produce, with hay rides, mazes, pumpkin patches, face painting, booths, homemade jam, cider and baked goods, hot corn and baked potatoes (see below).




In the NYC Metro area: 


~Dubois Farms in Highland, NY (Hudson Valley area) offers more than apple picking. Get ready for juicy grapes, sweet pears, other vegetables and a pumpkin or two to fill your wagon (available for rent). Since you weigh out in the barn, there is no checking of cars as you exit. Just show your receipt at the gate to the parking lot and you will be free to go. In between, stock up on the usual orchard fare: apple cider donuts, apple cider, barbecue snacks, even hard cider. When the kids get restless, they can romp in the play area of little houses, take a pony ride or simply run around in the field. Picking grapes, the huge variety of apples and the ample parking make this orchard a favorite.

~Lewin Farms in Calverton, Long Island is a huge operation. With over 1100 acres, it seems to dominate the LI scene but there are other farms. From May to October, you can pick berries, peaches, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, pumpkins and of course, apples. Because of the variety of produce, they have several locations, with the apple orchard in a different location than the farmstand. For the apples, they charge by the pound (whatever you can carry). You can bring your own bags and they sell the old fashioned wooden baskets.

~Nearby is Baiting Hollow Farm Vineyard, a fun filled vineyard (check the website for live music) complete with horse rides. Combine Lewin and Baiting Hollow (with the nearby Tanger Outlets in Riverhead) and you have a day trip guaranteed to please all ages in the family.

Baiting Hollow is charitable as well as fun!


~Other farms in the area (and they will let you know by the homemade signs along the way) are listed on longisland.com





Instead of east, with NYC as a center point, one can head north. Tourists are surprised to learn that New York is a top agricultural producer, one of the top five states in the country. Just one hour out of NYC and you'll be in farm country (you see the Catskill Mountains looming ahead of you on I-87). 


~Masker Orchards, in Warwick, NY, just barely over 100 years old, seems to have perfected the quintessential day in the "country." You can picnic within the orchard. There are "parking lots" but some areas of the orchard are wide enough for cars to park within the rows of the trees themselves. They charge a flat rate of 26.95 per bag picked (they provide the bags). On the bag itself is a map of the orchards (it helps to know your species of apples). 


Maskers Orchard: Family Fun Area (Editorial Use Only)

In the Family Fun Area was a full scale "festival:" country store, pony rides, haunted house, apple maze, face painting, pizza, apple pies, pumpkins, ATM machine (they do take credit cards, no Amex), and, hallelujah, rest rooms. By the way, be prepared to have your car checked for bootleg apples. They mean what they say about paying on your way out. No honor system here.


Maskers Orchard's Country Store (Editorial Use Only)

~Further up Route 17 or I-87, depending on how fast you want to get there, are several in New Paltz. The benefit of these farms is the proximity to several vineyards, Minnewaska State Park and the charming town of New Paltz itself, with its funky college vibe and historical French Huguenot houses. Apple Hill FarmDressel Farms and Wilklow Orchards are all good all have family fun.

In every region, be prepared for the traffic. Between the outlets, vineyards, farms and every day life on the week-ends (school football games, etc), my suggestion is to be at the farm by 10AM. When you are ready to leave around 12 noon, you will see the crowd heading in and you'll be glad you got there early.

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All Photos Copyright Marcia Crayton, 2018. All Rights Reserved.